Food - General

Reminiscing about wedding food

Brett & Christina WeddingIf you’ve been reading All’s Fare regularly, first – thank you. Second, you probably know that I was recently reading Michelle Maisto’s “Gastronomy of Marriage.” Before I begin, I have to say that this book is excellent. I love Michelle’s voice and her story. It’s not like you’re reading a book about a stranger planning a wedding, it’s like you’re a close friend and she’s telling you the story. Plus, it has some really good family recipes in it – both Italian and Chinese. I’m very excited to try them.

While reading Michelle’s book I was thinking back to February 15, 2008. Our wedding day. A cold and icy adventure in the middle of Wisconsin. But the planning was done months before. The one thing Brett and I really wanted to do right and do well was the food. More than two years later, we’re still hearing from our guests how fab the food was.

I have to thank the event planning staff and the culinary team at Hotel Metro in Milwaukee for the wonderful job they did. Also, the fabulous bakers at Simma’s in Wauwatosa for creating a Disney-inspired wedding cake.

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Cuisine - Chinese, Cuisine - Filipino, Recipes

A trip to the Asian grocery store

One of my favorite things to do is wander around the Asian grocery stores. While Milwaukee doesn’t have the supermarket-esque Super 88 grocery store that I came to adore while living in the Allston neighborhood of Boston during grad school, there are a few smaller Asian grocery stores that still have fresh produce and trans-Pacific items that I can’t find in the traditional big box markets. Here’s a video of the Super 88 and why I fell in love with it:

Whenever I walk into an Asian grocery store I always feel like an outsider. I don’t look overly Asian even though I’m half Filipino. I think more people would peg me as being Mediterranean before Asian. Still, I like the adventure that is always in store at the Asian grocery. I love being able to pick up the thick-skinned prickly fruit that looks like a puffer fish, hearing the different languages fromĀ  shoppers and filling my basket with treasures to cook in my bamboo steamer.

The aisles of the grocery stores are tightly packed with items that I don’t recognize the writing on but I can gather that some are oyster sauces, some are noodles, some are remnants of livestock that have been frozen or pickled. As I travel up and down each aisle scanning the contents, I’m taken to a completely different time and place. For other people walking the aisles, they’re taken to a familiar place. The items they place in their carts remind them of home – the land they left. I wonder to myself, “What’s his/her story?” and “What brought you here to this country?”

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